Psych Health and Safety Podcast

Live Panel Event - Beyond ROI: How Psych Health and Safety creates Social Impact

Episode Summary

Gaining top management and Board support for workplace mental health has always been difficult. This is likely due to a disconnect between what HR and wellbeing leaders want and what the Board believes is their business. Countless ROI research reports have been published internationally by reputable business consultancies on the positive financial benefit of workplace mental health initiatives – but no matter how large this ROI figure is – it has not been able to create substantive changes in how companies care for the mental health of their employees. Sustainability is a growing priority for companies and their boards wanting to improve reputation, increase investment and improve market valuations. It’s no longer good enough to be profitable, investors now expect companies they put their capital into to have business practices that are sustainable in relation to carbon footprints, labour policies, board makeup (also known as ESG). Social impact is the ‘S’ in this equation and is about how company practices affect employees, workers in the value chain, customers, and local communities. Is the growing importance of social impact on Board agendas the ‘golden ticket’ for those that have been advocating for improved workplace mental health? Are the popular methods for workplace mental health enough to demonstrate social impact, or is there a need to move to more systematic, risk-based approaches to psychological health required? And how do we measure social impact anyway? Join us in this engaging live panel event with regular co-host Jason van Schie, GM EHS Fresh Country Farms Wade Needham, GM People Risk QBE Rob Kosova and Georgina Camp - CEO and Founder of Huber Social.

Episode Notes

QBE: Premiums for Good: https://www.qbe.com/au/about/sponsorship-community/premiums4good

Huber Social: https://hubersocial.com.au/

People Management UK. Wellbeing classes do not improve workers’ mental health, research suggests: https://www.peoplemanagement.co.uk/news/articles/wellbeing-classes-do-not-improve-workers-mental-health-research-suggests

Leka & Jain (2010). Health Impact of Psychosocial Hazards at Work: An Overview. World Health Organization, Geneva. https://apps.who.int/iris/handle/10665/44428